PROJECT #122

Project #122 | Clean Water and Sanitation in Uganda

Our partnership with The Water Trust

In rural Uganda, preventable diseases and death due to contaminated water and poor hygiene practices are far too common. And yet many efforts to address these problems fail to have a sustainable impact. More than 1 in 3 wells end up broken and abandoned, wasting millions of dollars in investment and leaving families without clean water. 

Through our partnership with The Water Trust, 3 water points were built or repaired to serve 3 rural communities in Masindi, Uganda, 7 Self-Help Groups were created to manage the 3 water points and 4 neighboring water points, and Water and Sanitation Committees were assembled to oversee the improvement of hygiene and sanitation practice. The Water and Sanitation Committees are sustainable management groups within the communities that raise awareness of sanitation risks and mobilize action to address those risks. The Self-Help Group approach creates a local savings and credit cooperative, which provides a safe place to save and take out loans on a weekly basis. 

The Self-Help Groups and the Water and Sanitation Committees represent sustainable local institutions to take ownership of access to clean water, sanitation, and hygiene. This project empowered these groups to sustain and expand the project by investing in the maintenance and provision of water facilities. The success of The Water Trust’s hygiene and sanitation project depended on the community’s participation in the process and ultimately the empowerment of the community to sustain the improvements for years to come.

Our collective impact

Wells Constructed

People with Access to Clean Water

Self Help Groups Formed

Meet Emmanuel

Emmanuel is a 59 year-old community leader in Kimigi Village. He notes, “My community is happy for this new water point because they now have access to clean and safe water.” Before, women and children fetched water from an open source, shared with monkeys. He added that these monkeys used to attack their children, and the community lived in fear. The only option was for women and children to walk 6 km in search of safe water. Emmanuel says, “Our lives have completely changed since now water is near to our homes, and we can access it any time.”

Thank you for making this possible!

Our movement is grassroots, to us that not only means the work on the ground is led by local leaders with the support of the community, but it also means that we raise the funds for our projects through everyday donors just like you. In addition to all the donors that gave $25, $100, or $250 and the campaigners that ran a race or donated their birthday to raise funds, we also want to thank our generous business, school, and faith sponsors who believed in our work and joined the movement.

If you want to support future projects like this you can make a donation to our clean water fund.

 

 

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