PROJECT #133

Project #133 | Relief for South Sudanese Refugees

Our partnership with World Relief

Since gaining independence in 2011, the world’s newest country has struggled with poverty and instability. Ongoing conflict has displaced an estimated 2.4 million people in South Sudan, making this the largest refugee crisis in all of Africa and the third largest refugee crisis in the world. This situation is particularly difficult for the youngest victims of conflict and violence: children. Forced from the safety of their homes and communities, displaced children have often witnessed unspeakable violence and do not have access food or medical care. 

We partnered with World Relief to meet the immediate needs of children in the Bentiu refugee camp of South Sudan. Our partnership supported providing life-saving treatment to children under five as well as pregnant and nursing mothers, increasing food security for those most vulnerable. World Relief worked with farming and fishing households to provide aid in restarting livelihood activities, further ensuring food security. Finally, children whose education had been interrupted were provided with access to early childhood or primary education through temporary learning spaces. 

 

Our collective impact

Children Treated for Malnutrition

Children Enrolled in School

Total People Impacted

Meet Elizabeth

Elizabeth’s family of five arrived at camp Bentiu after fleeing violent conflict in their home village. They used to be a family of six, but lost their five-year-old daughter to dehydration and starvation while escaping the violence. Two of the other children were sick when they reached the camp, including two-year-old Angelina who was immediately admitted to World Relief’s feeding program for severely malnourished children. The program tracks the weight, height, and upper arm circumference of severely malnourished children. Mothers receive messages about best practices for young child feeding, such as information related to breastfeeding, complimentary foods, safe drinking water, and diet diversity. They also receive a weekly ration of special therapeutic food to give their malnourished child each day. In less than two months, Angelina was healthy enough to be discharged from the program. Though providing healthy food for her family is difficult with limited resources, Elizabeth realizes the importance of dietary diversity. Elizabeth says she will continue to practice the nutrition education that she received through the program. 

Thank you for making this possible!

Our movement is grassroots, to us that not only means the work on the ground is led by local leaders with the support of the community, but it also means that we raise the funds for our projects through everyday donors just like you. In addition to all the donors that gave $25, $100, or $250 and the campaigners that ran a race or donated their birthday to raise funds, we also want to thank our generous business, school, and faith sponsors who believed in our work and joined the movement.

If you want to support future projects like this you can make a donation to our refugee relief fund.

 

 

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