PROJECT #150

Project #150 | Building Classrooms in Rural Senegal

Our partnership with Andando

Prior to our partnership with Andando, The Fas Toucouleur Primary School in Senegal had 3 classrooms functional for 6 grades of students. The school had to use 3 makeshift, temporary classrooms to accommodate all of the students. The temporary classrooms did not provide adequate shelter which made it very hazardous for children to attend school. Many parents in the community did not believe it was worth it to send their children to school when it was in this condition, resulting in extremely lagging enrollment rates. Children were sent to work in agriculture or elsewhere instead. The other option was for families to send their children out of the community in order to adequate education, which is a big financial burden. Additionally, the school did not have a latrine for students to use. The lack of these facilities forced students into using facilities considered to be unsanitary. This put many of the students at risk and did not safeguard their privacy. 

Though our partnership with Andando, we funded the construction of 4 new classrooms as a permanent solution to the space shortage at Fas Toucouleur Primary School. Each classroom was equipped with a built-in library as well as desks for every student. Andando also constructed a proper block of latrines to be used by the students and a play field for extracurricular activities. 195 students enrolled in school and were able to benefit from the new learning environment. We are also very excited to see a 40% increase in the passing rate of students who attended these schools. 

 

Our collective impact

Total Students Impacted

Classrooms Built

Sanitary Latrines Built

Meet Oumou

Oumou is a local 13 year old girl who has benefited greatly from the classrooms provided and finished first in her class in her most recent year. She spoke very highly of Andando’s efforts and even said “They have done several things including a garden, three classrooms in addition to toilets. Another thing is that they brought many students to the outing in Gorée and Dakar. I was able to go to Gorée last year, then to the National Assembly, the different Ministries of Economic, Social, and Environmental councils, the Renaissance Monument, etc. This trip was very important for me and I learned many things, and woke up to a wider world around me”. She also mentioned the advantages of the new class and that the new school allowed her and her peers to learn in very good conditions without being exposed to dust and other risks that they were exposed to in temporary shelters.

Thank you for making this possible!

Our movement is grassroots, to us that not only means the work on the ground is led by local leaders with the support of the community, but it also means that we raise the funds for our projects through everyday donors just like you. In addition to all the donors that gave $25, $100, or $250 and the campaigners that ran a race or donated their birthday to raise funds, we also want to thank our generous business, school, and faith sponsors who believed in our work and joined the movement.

If you want to support future projects like this you can make a donation to our Children’s Education fund.

 

 

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