PROJECT #166

Project #166 | Access to Clean Water in South Sudan

Our partnership with Water for South Sudan

Having established its independence in 2011, South Sudan stands as one of the newest countries in the world and remains as one of the poorest in resources. South Sudan lacks the infrastructure necessary to provide its citizens with access to one of the most basic human rights: clean water. Without access to a clean water source, women and girls spend hours each day walking to find water. This leaves the women little time to establish other sources of income and girls the inability to attend school. Additionally, the water collected is often contaminated with harmful bacteria. People become sick from drinking this water while the very young and the elderly are especially vulnerable to water-borne illnesses and death. 

Our partnership with Water for South Sudan (WFSS) drilled one deep water well and rehabilitated two broken wells, providing 2,438 people access to clean, safe drinking water. Hygiene training sessions were provided in the three villages where the wells were either built or restored. The availability of water, coupled with basic hygiene information, brought improved health at the individual and community level. Communities were also indirectly impacted as children were given the opportunity to attend school and the community experienced increased stability of economic development.

Our collective impact

Wells drilled & rehabilitated

People with access to clean water

Members received hygeine education

Meet Akuen

“Before we received the new well, we used to get water from three hours away (six hours total). Our life wasn’t good. We were drinking water from unsafe sources like ponds, streams, and hand–dug wells. Our cattle, goats, and sheep were suffering with us due to inadequate water. The well changed our whole life. We no longer drink dirty water and our children are not sick from waterborne disease. Water for South Sudan also encouraged us to move our community school to a higher level of development. We managed to build three classrooms for our sons and daughters to study in. We have seen many other changes over the years. The well is easy for children and older people to use. Now we can send children as young as seven-years-old to fetch water for the family, and the child can succeed. We also grow vegetables and mango trees near the well.”

Thank you for making this possible!

Our movement is grassroots, to us that not only means the work on the ground is led by local leaders with the support of the community, but it also means that we raise the funds for our projects through everyday donors just like you. In addition to all the donors that gave $25, $100, or $250 and the campaigners that ran a race or donated their birthday to raise funds, we also want to thank our generous business, school, and faith sponsors who believed in our work and joined the movement.

If you want to support future projects like this you can make a donation to our water and sanitation fund.

 

 

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